News Brief - November 20

Thursday, November 20, 2008 | News

Paid Leave

Lawmakers push to expand paid leave

“But employers object to the proposal’s rigid, one-size-fits-all approach; it’s not needed, employers groups say, because 74 percent of employers already provide paid sick days…”

Because one-size-fits-74% ain’t bad…right? It’s not like we’re all in this together or anything…

Commerce association to challenge sick-day ordinance
“The Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce Board of Directors voted unanimously Monday to proceed with a legal challenge to the paid-sick-day ordinance that voters overwhelmingly approved Nov. 4.”

Later, the MMAC kicked a puppy.

Bush Changes to Employee Leave among First Midnight Rules

“The rule…will make it more difficult for employees to use paid leave when taking FMLA leave. Because FMLA leave is unpaid, employees often attempt to use paid leave, such as paid vacation time, to avoid disruptions in their pay.”

Those darn pesky workers, always trying to “avoid disruptions in pay” and “take their kids to the doctor and still afford to buy food for their family”.

Jobs, Mobility

The Tear-Down (Detroit Edition)
“The nation is said to be in need to some bottom-up economic stimulus. And NOW we’re going to tear down what remains of the country’s manufacturing core? We’re going to say good-bye to companies that collectively (and again, because of union bargaining power) provide health coverage for two million people (their direct employees, dependents, retirees, and supplier employees)??”

No ironic comment needed here!

Upward Mobility is So 1970s

“Between 1978 and 2005, CEO pay increased from 35 times to nearly 262 times the average worker’s pay,” the study finds. That’s because CEOs are making all of the important decisions that keep workers employed and our economy afloat…

Poverty

Poverty Here at Home: Part I
“But, again and again, when we talked about children in poverty nobody just talks about numbers or salaries. The conversation every time leads to talking about the structure of family.”

That sounds like a very productive conversation.

Langston University Helps Tackle Poverty in Tulsa

“Poverty in Oklahoma is substantial and it is real…It is also too expensive to be ignored.” 

The poverty banner is also expensive: it will cost you your policy goals. Public will can’t be bought with Poverty Pennies.

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