Scheduling in Hourly Jobs: Promising Practices for the Twenty-First Century Economy

Click here to see the full report

In good times and bad, workers at the front lines of many of today’s firms bear the brunt of fluctuations in demand for services and products through reductions in hours. Even before the current recession, today’s employers faced strong pressure to contain, if not minimize, labor costs, especially in industries, such as the service sector, where labor is a principal expenditure. Local communities suffer when residents’ jobs are unstable and their earnings unpredictable. In this report, Susan J. Lambert and Julia R. Henly of the University of Chicago  highlight several targets for intervention—ranging from improving employer scheduling practices to enacting new legislation—which could enhance the quality of jobs for hourly workers and, in turn, the quality of life in local communities. 

Click here to see the full report